Can You Take Your Kids Trick or Treating Without a Costume?

Can You Take Your Kids Trick or Treating Without a Costume?!?! 

While Halloween is a fun holiday for kids because they get to dress up and get treats, it’s also an exciting time for adults as they can party and enjoy.

But dressing well for this occasion is paramount.

But, Can You Take Your Kids Trick or Treating Without a Costume?

You need to understand that Halloween costumes are not a must-have for either kids or adults. But what’s the fun of going to get candy without a costume? While there are no rules to how you should dress up, it is just right that you and your kids wear appropriate Halloween costumes.

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Remember that the idea behind trick or treating is to “trick” a person into thinking that you are someone or something else. Then, you get rewarded with candy. So showing up at someone’s house without a costume and expecting to be rewarded can be considered rude. Some people will even feel uncomfortable opening the door for someone not wearing a costume during Halloween.

But, if you won’t ask for any candy and are simply escorting your kids, you can go without a costume. In that case, you can remain behind when they are knocking on different doors. But note that sometimes the kid may be scared to go alone. In that case, you can escort them but don’t expect any candy as you aren’t the one doing the trick or treating if you’ve not worn a costume. However, we still think it will be more fun to attempt to dress up.

How Old Is Too Old Go Trick or Treating?

Statistics by Treetopia revealed that 1 in four people believe they are never too old for Halloween trick or treating.

However, many people say that teenagers shouldn’t go to trick or treat.

According to their argument, these teenagers steal candies from the little kids during this holiday. But, it must be noted that trick or treating is a fair game.

So, even parents can still do it.

How to Trick and Treat with Your Kid for the First Time

Since the Covid-19 pandemic started, many of us have been cautious about being around many people at once.

But, while this is an excuse to miss trick or treating, it shouldn’t be.

Provided you keep some tips in mind, you and your child will remain safe and enjoy this holiday.

1. Make or Buy a Costume

You must ensure your child has one if you aren’t wearing a costume.

It’s wise to think ahead to get the best costume.

Remember that if an outfit is trendy, it may sell out in days. Therefore, you need to plan and get the costume ready on time.

If you are going for a homemade costume, don’t begin making it before consulting your child. You need to find out the theme they want and how many details they want to be included in the costume.

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Additionally, if you can’t afford to buy or sew a costume, think about a hand-me-down from a close friend.

Gently used good-quality costumes can be a lifesaver, especially if your budget is tight.

2. Decide on the Trick or Treating Route

Your safety and that of your kids are the most important during Halloween.

So, please make sure you choose a safe neighborhood for trick or treating.

The best route is where you live as you already know and trust the immediate neighbor.

But if you want a different route, familiarize yourself with the area before bringing your child. It is also wise to carry a flashlight if your activities are for the night.

3. Be Alert of Allergens

You need to be extremely careful if your child has serious food allergies.

Remember that many Halloween treats have allergens like soy, wheat, egg, and milk.

Remember that even if a specific candy is safe for your child, the different versions may include different ingredients that could harm them.

It is advisable to carry an epinephrine auto-injector all the time for children with allergies.

Also, it is wise to encourage your children to wash their hands before and after trick or treating.

And ensure that you are social distancing.

Even if things have returned to normalcy, it’s still wise to take precautions.

So, avoid clustering around one doorway. Instead, wait on the driveway for the other family to finish then you can go.

4. Make Your Home Safe For Trick or Treating

When discussing safety during Halloween, many of us think about the safety of the candy, costumes, and the neighborhood.

But did you know that your home can be unsafe for trick or treating?

Ensure you eliminate tripping hazards and debris that can cause slipping from your yard and walkway.

Additionally, ensure that your porch is well-lit. If you have burned-out bulbs, replace them with new functional ones.

And, remember to switch on the lights during the time trick or treaters might come.

Furthermore, control your pets, so they don’t scare or be aggressive towards a child.

If your yard is fenced, it may be best to leave your pet until trick or treating hours are over.

What If You Don’t Feel Like Trick or Treating This Year?

You could do many other things if you aren’t a fan of trick or treating.

For instance, you can do an Easter egg hunt to look for Halloween candy.

You hide the candy in your home and have your children look for it.

You can make this activity more fun by making it a scavenger hunt that includes clues on where the candy is.

Alternatively, you can do a socially distanced neighborhood parade if your neighbors are up for it.

Here, the kids will have a chance to showcase their costumes without needing to travel far from house to house.

Kids will have a chance to join the fun and showcase their cute or scary costumes.

You can also decide to watch Halloween movies at home with your kids. Or Facetime with your loved ones.

Final Thoughts

It may come off as rude to beg for candy when you’ve not attempted to dress up.

Therefore, have some sort of costume, even if it is just simple. Otherwise, just escort your kids and don’t ask for candy.

We must also mention that it’s essential to set some ground rules when you take your kids to trick or treating.

Have rules about candy, safety, and how far they can go. It’s also wise to get them a cell phone if you part ways. But this is for older children.

References

https://www.scarymommy.com/no-costume-no-candy-house-trick-or-treat

https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/10/31/20940741/halloween-how-old-trick-or-treating

https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=trick-or-treat-help-kids-celebrate-halloween-safely-197-30400

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